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Find the full schedule on our Academic Calendar

All course descriptions are available in the Catalog 

Academic Year 2024-25

Students may apply to enroll any time during the year. 

Term 1

August 12 - October 6, 2024 

The Pentateuch, Part 1 (BIB503) 3 credit hours
The first five books of the Old Testament are commonly called the Pentateuch or Torah. They tell the story of the nation of Israel from creation to their preparation to enter the land of Canaan. But the Pentateuch is much more than a historical account of Israel’s origins. It is the collection of covenant documents that defines the character and vocation of God's covenant people. This first half of our study focuses on the Book of Genesis and situates its original significance in relation to its first hearers, the Exodus community. Based on the lecture series The Pentateuch, produced by Third Millennium Ministries and hosted by Dr. Scott Redd, this course engages critical and evangelical scholars about the origin of the Pentateuch. It requires graduate level readings, spiritual formation activities, faculty tutorials, and engagement with a local mentor to understand and communicate the aims of the Book of Genesis to shape the identity and vocation of ancient Israel. (Part 1 is the pre-requisite for The Pentateuch, Part 2).

Building Your Theology (THE501) - 2 credit hours
For many, theology seems complicated, dry, abstract, and disconnected from the practices of everyday life. This spiritual dryness indicates a lack of spiritual health, and a way of practicing theology that misses the mark of its true aim—applying Scripture to all of life. As an introduction to theological method, this course will help you build your theology on the sure foundation of Scripture for the purpose of forming the mind, affections, and practices of a follower of Jesus Christ. Based on the lecture series, Building Your Theology, produced by Third Millennium Ministries and presented by Dr. Richard L. Pratt, Jr, this course employs graduate level readings, spiritual formation activities, faculty tutorials and engagement with a local mentor to explore resources for doing theology from general and special revelation with the aim of equipping local churches for its mission of discipling the nations.

Discipleship Practicum: Worship (MIS501) 1 credit hour

This practicum explores the scriptural elements of Christian worship, the history of its theological development, and its practice in a variety of cultural contexts. While the ministry of Word and Sacrament lies at its core, corporate worship reenacts the Gospel in other ways as well, including confession of sin and assurance of pardon, and our offer of ourselves, our gifts, both spiritual and material, and our praises and prayers back to God. This course uses graduate level readings, discussion forums, faculty tutorials, mentor meetings, and ministry activities to provide you with opportunities to worship God in different contexts and to reflect on practices of worship through the lens of Scripture, theology, and the history of the Christian mission where you serve.

New Course: Teaching and Preaching (MIS507) - 3 credits / Elective

This course enables the student to teach and preach the Word of God. It teaches biblical, theological and practical guidelines for these activities. The first half of the course focuses on teaching and learning together from Scripture with a focus on interaction in small groups. The second half of the course focuses on the preparation and delivery of sermons in corporate worship.

Term 2

October 21 – December 15, 2024 

The Pentateuch, Part 2 (BIB517) – 3 credit hours (Pre-requisite Part 1 BIB503)

The first five books of the Old Testament are commonly called the Pentateuch or Torah. They tell the story of the nation of Israel from creation to their preparation to enter the land of Canaan. This second half of our study examines the formative redemptive event of the Exodus and the giving of the covenant at Sinai to constitute Israel as a nation under Yahweh. This course, based on the lecture series The Pentateuch, produced by Third Millennium Ministries and hosted by Dr. Scott Redd, requires graduate level readings, spiritual formation activities, faculty tutorials, and engagement with a local mentor to understand how God’s covenant with Israel at Sinai echoes ancient near eastern covenants to form a nation with a peculiar vocation to reveal the wisdom, justice, and mercy of her God to the surrounding nations. [Pre-requisite: BIB503: The Pentateuch, Part 1]

 

We Believe in Jesus (THE509) 3 credit hours

This course investigates the biblical accounts about Jesus of Nazareth, the Messiah of Israel and Lord of all. The canonical witness of the prophets and apostles provides the core content translated, interpreted, summarized, and developed in the doctrine of Christology. In this course, students will see how the teachings of Scripture about Christ have been applied as the gospel has entered new cultures and as its peoples have raised new questions about Christ and his kingdom. Employing the lecture series, We Believe in Jesus, produced by Third Millennium Ministries and hosted by Dr. Dan Doriani, this course requires graduate level readings, spiritual formation activities, faculty tutorials, and engagement with a local mentor to understand and apply the three offices of Christ in local ministry. How does Christ continue to reign as King, intercede as Priest, and speak as Prophet?

 

Outreach Practicum (MIS503) 1 credit hour

This practicum is divided into two parts: 1) congregational practices of outreach, and 2) congregational structures of outreach. The structures of outreach support and extend the practices of outreach to a congregation’s neighbors locally and to the nations globally. These practices and structures are the focus of the Church’s mission to “make disciples of all nations” (Matt 28:19). Through graduate level readings, discussion forums, outreach activities, faculty tutorials, and mentor meetings, students are provided an evaluative framework for congregational outreach, and opportunities for direct participation. 

New Course: Defending the Faith (MIS505) - 3 credits / Elective 

Sometimes Christians tend to shy away from the world, living in a "spiritual bubble” where it feels more comfortable and secure.Sometimes we aren't sure how to articulate our faith or relate it to current issues, because we have our own questions and doubts. We find it difficult to share our faith with people who have left the church because of difficulties or hurts. But, studies show that a large majority of the “dechurched” remain spiritually interested or curious. How do we engage their questions and invite them back?

 

This course guides students to take their own doubts seriously and to develop Christian practices of inquiry in order to better understand non-believers and become more confident in addressing their honest questions. In a word, the student will be more confident of God’s care for and involvement with the people and pain of the world, and better able to bear witness to it.

 

Term 3

January 6 – March 2, 2025 

The Book of Acts (BIB504) 2 credit hours 

The Acts of the Apostles is the second volume in Luke’s two-volume account of the arrival of the reign of Israel’s God in Jesus, the Son of David, and its extension through Jesus’ witnesses to the ends of the earth. This study of Acts focuses on how Luke’s narrative shaped early Christian identity and mission in the wake of “the Way’s” rupture with the synagogue and its relationship to the rival claims of other gods and lords in the Mediterranean culture(s) of the first century. How, then, does the Book of Acts continue to shape the Church’s worship and witness to Christ and His Kingdom among the nations? Utilizing the lecture series, The Book of Acts, produced by Third Millennium Ministries and presented by Dr. Hans F. Bayer, this course employs graduate level readings, spiritual formation activities, faculty tutorials, and engagement with a local mentor to understand and apply the Book of Acts in the worship and witness of local congregations.

 

What is Man? (THE510)3 credit hours 

This course is an introduction to theological anthropology - the doctrine of humanity. In every culture throughout history, people have asked fundamental questions of human identity and vocation: “Who are we? Why are we here? What went wrong? How can we heal and flourish?” The Bible tells us that human beings, both male and female, are God’s images, created to rule over and care for creation on God’s behalf. Though sin has defaced and deformed humankind, diminishing our identity and compromising our vocation, God sent Christ, his Son and True Image to restore us to our true selves and work. This course combines the lecture series, What is Man?, produced by Third Millennium Ministries and hosted by Dr. Gregory R. Perry, with graduate level readings, spiritual formation activities, faculty tutorials, and engagement with a local mentor to explore these fundamental questions of human identity and vocation.

Nurture Practicum (MIS502) – 1 credit hour

This practicum develops your ministry practices of spiritual care, taking into account the emotional dimension of ministry, which is often omitted in traditional discipleship programs. The gospel changes our whole being, including our emotions. This course uses graduate level readings, discussion forums, faculty tutorials, mentor meetings, and ministry activities to cultivate an emotionally healthy spirituality that is consistent with the teachings and practices of Jesus. This course is not intended to treat issues of pastoral care exhaustively, but aims at an understanding of how transformation occurs through the Spirit’s work in each of us through the means of grace.

New Course: Christian Counseling (MIS504) - 3 credits / Elective 

Books written on Christian counseling generally describe “what” it is without showing us “how” to counsel. This course relies heavily on the book “Skills for Effective Counseling” written by Elisabeth A. Nesbit Sbanotto, Heather Davediuk Gingrich, and Fred C. Gingrich, who have decades of professional experience. They show us how they do it. Recognizing the limitations of training in counseling through the internet, we will learn and practice the "micro skills" necessary to effectively counsel people. Some of the topics that we will deal with are: the counselor as an instrument; how do I perceive the counselee and how do they perceive me?; how do I develop the ability to accurately interpret what the counselee communicates to me?; how can I manage emotions and develop deep empathy? All of these questions will be considered from a faith-based integration perspective.

New Course: Vocational Discipleship: Following Christ in our Work - (MIS510) – 2 Credits / Elective

The Law and the Prophets speak directly to Israel’s relationship to the land and other means of production; to the just valuation of theproducts of their labor; to fair wages for workers; and, to the dignified treatment of vulnerable members of society. Indeed, the scriptures of the Old and New Testament support Martin Luther’s claim that God does his work through the work of people to provide for humankind’s needs.

 

However, the Bible also testifies to the effects of sin on people’s work, creating inequities; damaging relations; even causing injury and death. However, Christ’s work of redemption created a new way for humans to work and create as God originally intended. While pastors and other Christian leaders are not necessarily experts in the many aspects of human labor, they are called to train God’s people to work in faith, to do everything as unto the Lord. This course is designed to provide perspectives and practices for this work of vocational discipleship.

 

Term 4

March 17 – May 11, 2025 

 

Making Biblical Decisions (THE513) – 3 credit hrs

Christian morality has always been challenged and rejected by unbelievers, but today even many believers have lost their moral footing. Moreover, believers who want to live ethically are frequently confused by the complexities of ethical decisions. Based on the lecture series, Making Biblical Decisions, produced by Third Millennium Ministries and presented by Dr. John M. Frame, this course incorporates graduate level readings, spiritual formation activities, faculty tutorials, and engagement with a local mentor to build on both parts of the Foundations of Interpretation series. We cultivate biblical wisdom by studying the Bible’s own system of covenantal ethics, and learning to apply its evaluative framework and practices to approach present challenges, temptations, and problems in ways that lead to biblical solutions.

Heart of Paul’s Theology (BIB514) – 2 credit hrs 

Paul passionately proclaimed the good news of individual salvation in Jesus Christ, but this wasn’t the heart or scope of his gospel. According to Paul, salvation is not primarily about individuals being saved; rather, it is the triumph of God over evil and the reality of Christ’s kingdom taking root in communities of renewed image-bearers amidst all nations. This course unpacks Paul’s missional hermeneutic and missionary method. By studying Paul’s letters to the Galatian, Thessalonian, and Corinthian churches, you will gain a deeper understanding of the kingdom of God and rejoice in Christ’s plans for his people and his world. Based on the lecture series, The Heart of Paul’s Theology, produced by Third Millennium Ministries and presented by Dr. Reggie M. Kidd, this course employs graduate level readings, spiritual formation activities, faculty input and oversight with local mentor engagement to explore the message, missionary methods and church-forming mission of the Apostle Paul.

New Course: Basic Greek and Exegesis (BIB525) 3 Credits / Elective

This course teaches the fundamentals of Greek morphology and grammar as well as the steps of New Testament exegesis. It explains how to use linguistic tools, including software programs. It includes Power Point presentations with pronunciation of Greek vocabulary and exercises in grammar. As students progress, they do their own exegesis of a New Testament passage and prepare a summary of their findings in preparation for preaching or teaching.

  

Term 5

May 26 – July 20, 2025 

Your Kingdom Come: Eschatology (THE511) – 2 credit hours

The topic of eschatology, or the end of history, has fascinated people for centuries. What does the Bible say about the goal of history? How have various branches of the global church described the Day of the Lord and the Millennium? In this course, students examine what the Scriptures teach about the last days, including a variety of challenging topics, such as the general resurrection, the final judgment, and the consummation of Christ’s messianic kingdom in the new heavens and new earth. Incorporating the lecture series, Your Kingdom Come: The Doctrine of Eschatology, produced by Third Millennium Ministries and hosted by Dr. Matt Friedman, this course requires graduate level readings, spiritual formation activities, faculty tutorials, and engagement with a local mentor to understand and apply eschatology to Christian missions and ethics.

 

New Course: Evangelism And Church Planting (MIS509) – 2 Credits / Elective​

This course encourages and trains students to share the gospel and to plant new churches. It presents the principles, steps, anddifferent models for developing healthy churches and guides the students through the process of preparing their own plans for starting a new church.

Capstone Project & Portfolio (MIS603)  – 3 credit hours 

This cumulative assessment is designed in two parts: the Portfolio and the Project. The Portfolio requires you to revisit earlier assessments that were designed to demonstrate mastery of one of five program learning outcomes, each of which is tied to a key resource for sustainable ministry. The Project celebrates your learning by applying your findings to your current or future ministry in the form of a philosophy of ministry and strategic plan. The fifth resource for sustainable ministry is your own sense of your pastoral identity, ministry calling, spiritual gifts, personal wounds and weaknesses. Your Capstone Project appropriates the other four resources—Scripture, Theology, Discipleship Practices in the Church, and the cultural resources of your local context—through your own awareness of your pastoral identity, calling, gifts, and weaknesses. This depth of self-awareness only comes through consistent appropriation of the other resources in ongoing relation to a mentor, spiritual director, or other ministry colleague, who will encourage you, pray for you, and tell you the truth in love.

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